The Eclipse: When to view in Virginia and North Carolina

News19's Jim and Efren give you eclipse safety tips.

Virginia and North Carolina may not be in the path of totality when it comes to the once-in-a-lifetime eclipse that's taking place on August 21, but you can still catch a glimpse of the partial eclipse in the Old Dominion and the Tar Heel state!

LIVE VIDEO: Follow the solar eclipse from coast to coast

Most everyone will get a good show, but some areas of the region will see the eclipse for a little longer than others.

Here is a look at some of the starting times and optimal viewing times in Virginia and North Carolina:

VIRGINIA

Charlottesville

Starting time: 1:15 p.m.

Optimal viewing: 2:41 p.m.

Richmond 

Starting time: 1:17 p.m.  

Optimal viewing: 2:44 p.m.

McLean

Starting time: 1:17 p.m.

Optimal viewing: 2:42 p.m.  

Franklin  

Starting time: 1:19 p.m.  

Optimal viewing: 2:45 p.m.

Suffolk 

Starting time: 1:20 p.m.

Optimal viewing: 2:46 p.m. 

Williamsburg 

Starting time: 1:19 p.m.  

Optimal viewing: 2:45 p.m.

Newport News  

Starting time: 1:20 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:46 p.m.

Gloucester 

Starting time: 1:20 p.m.  

Optimal viewing: 2:45 p.m.

Accomac 

Starting time: 1:21 p.m.  

Optimal viewing: 2:46 p.m.

Norfolk

Starting time: 1:21 p.m.  

Optimal viewing: 2:47 p.m.

Virginia Beach   

Starting time: 1:21 p.m.

Optimal viewing: 2:47 p.m.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

Asheville

Starting time: 1:08 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:37 p.m.

Charlotte

Starting time: 1:12 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:41 p.m.

Raleigh  

Starting time: 1:16 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:44 p.m.

Gatesville

Starting time: 1:20 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:47 p.m.

Elizabeth City

Starting time: 1:21 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:48 p.m.

Currituck

Starting time: 1:22 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:48 p.m.

Kill Devil Hills

Starting time: 1:23 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:49 p.m.

Hatteras

Starting time: 1:23 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:50 p.m.

Rodanthe

Starting time: 1:24 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:50 p.m.

Buxton  

Starting time: 1:24 p.m. 

Optimal viewing: 2:51 p.m.

So how about your neighborhood? NASA has made a wonderful interactive map that lets you zoom (the zoom controls are on the right hand side of the map) into your community and find out exactly when the eclipse will begin, when you'll see totality (the moment when the moon comes completely in front of the sun) and when the last moment you'll see it at all.

Just click on your city or neighborhood when you've zoomed in.

The differences aren't great (in most cases they vary by a few seconds, usually less than a minute) but it is fascinating and informative to see. 

You can get this interactive map going to the NASA Solar Eclipse Website.

Oh, and more thing, and this is critically important: do NOT attempt to look at the sun during the eclipse, even when we have totality. You could causes permanent, severe damage to your eyes. And sunglasses will not work either. You need to find approved solar eclipse glasses that can block out the sun. We have what you need to know before you get your glasses, which you find on the 13News Now Solar Eclipse Page

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