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This year's U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree is from California and we'll take you along for the ride

Affectionately named "Sugar Bear", we will be tracking the tree's journey from the Six Rivers National Forest to Washington D.C.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — For the past 50 years, a tree from a different U.S. Forest has had the honor of being on display on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol during the holidays. For the 2021 holidays that tree will come from the Six Rivers National Forest in Northern California. ABC10 is proud to be the media partner with the U.S. Forest Service and Choose Outdoors to help tell the story of the People’s Tree.

The tree was harvested on Saturday, October 23rd and is safely packed for the 4,000 mile journey to Washington D.C. In total, the tree will be making 18 stops across the country before reaching its final destination.

MAP: FOLLOW THE U.S. CAPITOL CHRISTMAS TREE'S JOURNEY HERE

In July, ABC10 reporter John Bartell accompanied members of the U.S. Forest Service as they identified half a dozen trees for the top holiday honor. The Architect of the Capitol staff made the final choice a few days later – an 84-foot tall white fir affectionately dubbed “Sugar Bear”.

From now until the annual tree lighting in early December, we’ll be bringing you updates on Sugar Bear and tracking its journey from California and across the country until it reaches Washington, D.C.

Sugar Bear and 80-plus smaller trees that will adorn Congressional and Federal office buildings need your help creating thousands of ornaments and individual tree skirts in time for their holiday debut. 

To find out how you can get contribute click HERE.

If you’re just curious about the history of the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, check out the Architect of the Capitol's website HERE.

Keep checking back here often for more updates and information about Sugar Bear and its journey and stops across the country as the People’s Tree.

PART 1: California was chosen to provide the Christmas tree for the U.S. Capitol. Meet the man who found it.