x
Breaking News
More () »

Norfolk's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Norfolk, Virginia | 13NEWSNOW.com

Antonio Banderas reveals he has tested positive for COVID-19

The announcement came on the Spanish actor's 60th birthday.

Antonio Banderas announced Monday that he tested positive for coronavirus.

The announcement came via Twitter on the Spanish actor's 60th birthday.

“I’d like to add that I’m feeling relatively well, just a bit more tired than usual, and confident that I will recover as soon as possible,” the actor tweeted in Spanish, which was translated to English. 

Banderas added that he is currently quarantined and is following medical instructions with the hope of overcoming "the infectious period that I am suffering."

“I will take advantage of this isolation to read, write, rest and continue making plans to begin to give meaning to my 60 years, to which I arrive full of enthusiasm. A big hug to everyone,” Banderas concluded.

The academy award nominated actor has played roles in several films including "The Mask of Zorro," "Pain and Glory" and "Evita."

RELATED: Schools mull outdoor classes amid virus, ventilation worries

Credit: Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP
Actor Antonio Banderas attends a screening of "Picasso" at the BMCC Tribeca PAC during the 2018 Tribeca Film Festival on Friday, April 20, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)

RELATED: US surpasses 5 million coronavirus cases, to astonishment and alarm of Europe

For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some — especially older adults and people with existing health problems — it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, and death.

The United States had recorded more than 5 million cases of COVID-19 as of Monday at 10:30 a.m. ET, according to a Johns Hopkins University tracker, with nearly 163,000 deaths.

RELATED: Dollar Tree updates mask policy again, now requires them for shoppers

RELATED: Projected coronavirus deaths in US could surpass those of World War II