GLOUCESTER COUNTY, Va. (WVEC) – Many homeowners in Gloucester County said no way to new flooding signs.

They said the “Road May Flood” signs brings down the value of their homes. Two signs are located along Jenkins Neck Road in the Guinea area of Gloucester.

Angry homeowners are taking the county and VDOT to the task.

Iris West has lived in the county almost 60 years. Her husband, more than 80 years. She loves Gloucester, but not the new signs. There's a sign down the road from her home.

West and at least 40 others in the area said the signs decrease the value of their homes. West feels as if county leaders are condemning the area.

“The entire area floods, not just down here,” West said. “If someone sees these signs, they won't even think of looking at buying our homes.”

One homeowner rounded up at least 40 people, and they're talking about possibly suing the county and VDOT.

However, they want to work with county leaders first before moving forward with any lawsuit.

The County's Floodplain Management Committee asked VDOT to put up the signs a month ago in the most flood-prone areas of the county.

However, County Administrator Brent Fedors sent 13News Now an email that said:

“The County's Floodplain Management Committee made recommendations for placement of the "Road May Flood" signs in the most flood-prone areas of the County, and the County requested VDOT's support on making and placing the signs. The primary goal of the initiative is centered around public safety during inclement weather events.

We have had a few citizens relaying their concerns on the matter, and due to the threat of imminent legal action, the County has asked VDOT to suspend the installation project temporarily, as concerns are being received and collected for review with the County Attorney.

Once reviewed with the County Attorney, I anticipate the Board of Supervisors will want to consider the matter and provide guidance on the path forward.”

Not everyone has an issue with the signs.

Horace Bonniville's family moved to the area in 1830. He sees the signs as a way to better inform the public.

“I think they're the best thing since Christ was born,” Bonniville said. “The state is doing this for our safety!”

Homeowners like West plan to speak out until the signs are gone.

Board supervisor Phillip Bazzani said because so many people complained about the signs, he is going to suggest the board remove the signs.

VDOT's role was limited to ensuring each sign installation would not pose a safety hazard to motorists and having VDOT crew members physically install the signs.

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